Friday, June 26, 2015

French students can't "cope"

There's (yawn) another student protest in France with week - but wait, before you tune out, this one involves language! The students are protesting the appearance of the English word "cope" in the English proficiency section of baccalaureate exam (which requires students to be proficient in not just one, but two foreign languages!). To quote from the NY Times:


The students said they were baffled by a passage from the best-selling novel “Atonement,” by Ian McEwan, in which the word “cope” appeared. Then came two questions about a character named Turner: “What concerns him about the situation?” and “How is Turner coping with the situation?”

Twelve thousand students signed a petition claiming that the word "cope" is not easily translatable into French. Some say the very concept has no exact equivalent, although a letter to the Times refutes this as "utter nonsense," pointing out that there are two verbs, se débrouiller and s'en sortir, that mean precisely that.

I won't enter the fray, except to point out that this same week, French taxi drivers, unable to cope with competition from Uber, were staging disruptive, even violent strikes, prompting Courtney Love to tweet that Baghdad is safer than Paris. Ouille!

One final note: Only 4 days left to buy Flirting with French on Kindle, Nook, or Apple for the appropriately insane price of $1.99! At that price surely it's worth the e-ink it's written on!

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